Farmers McGee … That’s Us

We’re gonna need your help with this. If you pray, say a prayer. If not, wish us luck or send us vibes or whatever you’re into.

We’re trying to grow tomatoes.

As you can see, the plants are already grown. So, this should be easy. But no. I feel fortunate every morning that I wake up and see green grass. I have the least-green thumb of anyone on earth. Even though we bought tomato plants, not seeds, this will be an adventure of the highest magnitude.

I took those pictures last Saturday. We went to the local nursery and bought four tomato plants. They had, like, 75 different varieties to choose from! What’s up with that??! Ummm, I’d like the red ones. That I can eat. If they manage to survive having me as their farmer.

We put two plants into the Topsy-Turvy gizmo, which is now hanging in our back yard. I planted the other two in the rock bed that runs along our front patio/walkway. I’m sure an actual farmer/gardener would’ve known better where to put them, taking sun exposure and God-knows-what-else into consideration. I have no idea how often to water them, but we’ve had a few days of rain lately, so I think they’re doing okay. All tomato plants appear to be alive as of this afternoon.

But that could totally change by the time I wake up. Wish us luck. Or say a prayer. Or both. Definitely both.

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4 Responses to Farmers McGee … That’s Us

  1. Sherry & Steve May 21, 2010 at 8:37 pm #

    M2: When we grew tomatoes, we got infested by the tomato horn worm: http://www.gardengrapevine.com/TomatoWorm.html … that was the most disgusting creature I think I’ve ever encountered. Scared the bejesus out of us. Hopefully the ‘maters in the topsy turvey won’t see the horn worm. Good luck to y’all!

  2. Phil R May 22, 2010 at 2:47 pm #

    The misses and I do deck farming… herbs mostly. Nothing like fresh basil for summer pesto!

  3. MiriamEllis May 24, 2010 at 2:36 pm #

    Hey, Matt,
    Totally wishing you luck!!!

    Matt, here are tips:

    1. Water regularly, not irregularly. If this means a deep watering every 4 days, on the dot, that’s better than a little here and a whole lot there. I’ve never grown tomatoes upside down in a basket before but you should feel the soil with your fingers for dryness as soil exposed to open air dries more quickly than soil that’s…well, in the ground.

    2. Plant calendula around your tomatoes. This is a pretty annual flower. Bugs do not like it.

    3. If you get aphids on your tomato blossoms (this often happens) here is my non-toxic fail-proof tip. Cut some big garlic cloves in half so that their insides are exposed. Shake the plants gently so that the aphids fall on the ground. Rub the garlic on the little flowers stems and flowers. Aphids do not like the taste of garlic. This is a humane and safe method of caring for tomato plants.

    Good luck!!!

    BTW: Hornworm usually happens when there isn’t a good ecological balance in the neighborhood. Sometimes, you’ve really got to work hard to invite birds and other predators to come live in your yard to keep things balanced. Nurseries will try to sell you BT if you tell them you have hornworm, but that stuff is seriously bad news for people and animals. Don’t use pesticides. Take the sustainable approach of improving your soil and environment for better gardening years for yourself and future generations. Sermon over.

  4. Emily June 1, 2010 at 5:06 am #

    Hey, Matt,
    Totally wishing you luck!!!

    Matt, here are tips:

    1. Water regularly, not irregularly. If this means a deep watering every 4 days, on the dot, that’s better than a little here and a whole lot there. I’ve never grown tomatoes upside down in a basket before but you should feel the soil with your fingers for dryness as soil exposed to open air dries more quickly than soil that’s…well, in the ground.

    2. Plant calendula around your tomatoes. This is a pretty annual flower. Bugs do not like it.

    3. If you get aphids on your tomato blossoms (this often happens) here is my non-toxic fail-proof tip. Cut some big garlic cloves in half so that their insides are exposed. Shake the plants gently so that the aphids fall on the ground. Rub the garlic on the little flowers stems and flowers. Aphids do not like the taste of garlic. This is a humane and safe method of caring for tomato plants.

    Good luck!!!

    BTW: Hornworm usually happens when there isn’t a good ecological balance in the neighborhood. Sometimes, you’ve really got to work hard to invite birds and other predators to come live in your yard to keep things balanced. Nurseries will try to sell you BT if you tell them you have hornworm, but that stuff is seriously bad news for people and animals. Don’t use pesticides. Take the sustainable approach of improving your soil and environment for better gardening years for yourself and future generations. Sermon over.

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